people

Stacia Wegst

 
 

605 Natural Science Complex


Chemistry
srwegst at buffalo edu
 

Research interests

  • Environmental Analytical Chemistry

  • Phytoremediation

Personal statement

Stacia grew up locally in the Buffalo area with a creek and forest in her back yard.  Spending her time exploring the creek, she was fascinated by nature and its interactions.  The ERIE program and the study of environmental chemistry enable her to take a childhood interest and further her study of it.
Stacia’s research focuses on heavy metals and nanoparticles in the environment, and their remediation.  She plans to study their uptake into plants by phytoremediation by using imaging techniques such as laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) and time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMs).  These imaging techniques will help elucidate the uptake process of contaminants from the environment.

Education

  • B.A. in Chemistry and Mathematics (University at Buffalo, 2010)

Presentations

  • Wegst, S.; Aga, D.; Lupton, S.  Determining Key Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals in the Environment using Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA).  Poster presented at the University at Buffalo Celebration of Academic Excellence Symposium, Buffalo, New York, April 2009.

  • Wegst, S.; Tso, J.; Schneider, S.; Aga, D.  Optimization of an Enzyme-linked Immunosorbent Assay and Sample Clean-up for the Analysis of 17β-Estradiol in Poultry Litter.  Presentation at the 2010 Western New York American Chemical Society Undergraduate Research Symposium, Niagara University, New York, March 6, 2010

  • Wegst, S.; Tso, J.; Schneider, S.; Aga; D.  Optimization of an Enzyme-linked Immunosorbent Assay and Sample Clean-up for the Analysis of 17β-Estradiol in Poultry Litter.  Poster presented at 2010 American Chemical Society Conference, San Francisco California, March 21-25 2010

  • Aly, D.F.; Wegst, S.R.; Gardella, J.A. Jr.; Aga, D.S.  Environmental Aerosol Emmissions into a Residential Neighborhood Analysis by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS).  Poster presented in the 2011 National Science Foundation Research Experience for Undergraduates poster session at the University at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York, August 4, 2011